MEMORY CARE GARDEN

A Retirement Community commissioned a Memory-Care Garden for residents suffering from dementia. Such gardens require specific programs with stringent limitations and careful

Planting Plan
Dimension Control Plan
Grading and Stormwater Plan

STORE FRONT GARDEN

A retail store requested design services to “soften” their unwelcoming hardscape and transition from a harsh parking lot to their pedestrian area. Redesigning the hardscape was not possible in this case, and ground planting was unavailable, so the challenge was to fulfill the program requirements using only planters and to do so without resorting to “defensive” design. Fortunately, this client had wonderful maintenance services, so I was able to design an extravagant flora palette that would have been unavailable in harsher conditions.

The results demonstrate the value and utility of thoughtful and effective design. The resulting benefits speak for themselves. This palette features Alocasia x amazonica, Plectranthus Scutellarioides (formerly Coleus blumei), Calibrachoa parviflora, Zinnia x, and Lantana camara, among others.

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THE LITTLE-BARN GARDEN

I changed my life radically after many years in academia. I sold nearly all of my belongings, loaded what remained into a fifteen-foot U-haul, and left Chicago to begin an entirely new career in the field of landscape architecture.

I needed a place to store my things while I completed my training. Paid storage was an option, but I’d worked on countless building projects throughout my life—I’m pretty “handy,” as they say—and I thought, “why not build yourself a little barn?” It  sounded fun, and it was the most economic option, too. My family was kind enough to allow me to build on a little spot tucked on the edge of their property in Eastern North Carolina, so I set about building my “Little Barn.”

My Little Barn quickly became “The Little Barn Garden”: a rampart, a playground, a bio-lab, my test fields, my sweet, experimental plant playground full of experimental beds and F1 hybrids!

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THE ARTISTS’ BACKYARD

A university selected a prominent but neglected area of their campus to install a multi-phased design-build transforming “left-over” space into a nexus of beauty, activity, and engagement. The project was multi-phased and interdisciplinary and involved many people working over the course of several years in collaboration with the university’s horticulture and meteorology departments, university housing, student affairs, university architects, and grounds management, among others.

I wore many hats working on The Artists’ Backyard—from running meetings and leading teams, to schematic design and design development, to construction documents, mixing concrete, installing boulders, and wrangling teams of colleagues and workers. However, my primary role was to design, procure, and install an exceptional woodland under-story planting, which incorporated an intermittent stream and rain garden basin. The result won North Carolina’s 2015 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Community Appearance. A picture of the  transformed space is shown below.

Before
After

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